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Losing a hind leg never slowed down this pup thanks to help from a local clinic. healing Falco 22 Toombs County Magazine BY TERI R. WILLIAMS | PHOTOS BY DAPHNE WALKER the dog that attacked our two-year-old son Micah was characterized as a breed “great with children.” The scars from over thirty stitches on his face are barely visible today thanks to Dr. McArthur, who was an incredible doctor and surgeon in Lyons for many years. Although it would be easy to characterize all dogs in the breed by our experience, the breed was not to blame. Every dog has its own personality, just like people, and should not be judged as a group. Characteristics of different dog breeds are sometimes manipulated by abuse and neglect to create bad behavior. The fact is that any dog can be trained to be aggressive. As a result, negative judgments have been made about a breed as a whole. None have suffered more from such suppositions as the Rottweiler, a German breed whose size and strength was once used to herd cattle and pull carts to market. And none have personally suffered more for such judgments than the beautiful black and tan faced Rottweiler named Falco. When Amanda Shook introduced me to Falco, I slowly put my hand out for the dog to sniff. I knew all the rules for first time introductions to dogs (which I’d learned from Sesame Street, of course). Amanda assured me that her Rottweiler loved to be petted. When my granddaughter Lily walked up beside me, Falco wagged her tail and came closer for her to be petted, which was no small feat with only three legs to stand on. Amanda and Falco followed me into the Blue Marquee Theatre where Falco quickly found herself a spot to lay down and nap in the aisle. “For three Fridays now we’ve been working on getting her prepared for a prosthetic at Hanger Clinic,” said Amanda. “Today she got to try on the prototype.” From a video she’d made, I watched as Derek put the prosthetic in place. It took a few steps before Falco actually shifted her weight onto the prosthetic leg. In less than two minutes, Falco was running on four legs for the first time since her amputation. It was truly amazing. “They have to make a couple of adjustments, but she did great!” “What happened to Falco?” I asked. I quickly learned that it was a question no one may ever be able to fully answer. In 2013 Amanda and her husband Stephen moved with their two children, Kaitlyn (Timmer,


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