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AN ESSENTIAL NOTE • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • George Boehme is the publisher of Essentials Magazines and InstantNewsNetwork.com. He has lived in West University Place for more than 25 years with his wife, Elizabeth, and their 18-year-old twins. PagPea g5 e| 5W WESETS UT UE SESSESNETNITAILASLS If Public Works Director David Beach gets his way, every trash day will also be heavy trash day. West U has gone from two heavy trash days a year to one a week, and now Beach proposes two a week. My mother thanks you, my father thanks you, my sister thanks you, and I thank you. West University Place City Manager Chris Peifer presented his proposed budget for 2018. The City Council �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� to Peifer’s proposal. Normally, though, those changes are minor because the budget is crafted to incorporate the wish lists of councilmembers. Highlights of the Peifer budget: Beginning construction on making West University Place a virtual-gated community, no water bill increase, and hiring a communications manager to improve the city’s communication with residents. The price tag for the Peifer budget? An additional $5.08 a month ($60.60 annually) for the average West U homeowner. The typical annual West U tax bill would be $3,455. That sure looks good from where I sit. Just wish I perceived the same value from all the other taxes I pay. I am excited about the proposal to make West U a virtual gated community. It appears to be a fait accompli because all councilmembers seem to support the idea. We will have a feature story on the details of the proposal in the November magazine. On the cover, we ask the rhetorical question, “How much is too much to spend on a West U park?” We speak to the issue on Page 15. The background for the case is simple: A gracious resident, James Hughes, passed away and he donated his oversized property and �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� to become a “quiet” public park named after his mother. The preliminary price tag is about $700K. After a delayed start, the bells are ringing at the schools again. My fall vegetable garden is planted with a new tomato species in the mix — Cherokee Purple. I know a guy who swears by them. Our October means parent’s weekends for this empty-nester couple. First we visit Emma at Bennington College, and two weeks later we ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� I never knew how much I could miss fussing at my daughter. Hope you enjoy our October magazine. See you in November.


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