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evolving in a country where soda bread is king) and cheese-makers, curry kitchen, butcher, green grocers and chocolatiers. At Crepes in the City, all the ingredients for the sweet and savory crepes are sourced from within the market itself. The bustle of the crowd prompted Ms. Corrigy to comment that markets are becoming centers of community gathering, replacing pub and church. Silke Cropp’s Corleggy Cheese shares an interesting pedigree with other artisan farmhouse cheeses, such as Knockalara and Dingle Peninsula: They were each started by Germans who immigrated to Ireland some 25 years ago and couldn’t find the cheese they remembered from home. Corleggy cheeses are all made from raw milk, sheep or cow, resulting in cheeses with big aromas and clean flavors. Along a stone wall in the north end of the market The Temple Oyster Bar serves up plump oysters. The Atlantic-raised oysters, this week from County Sligo, were cold and briny, sweet and a bit buttery. They were accompanied by a fresh mignonette and a glass of crisp white wine (French, but maybe that’s about to change). David Llewellyn, who sells apples, ciders and vinegars at the market, planted a vineyard in Lusk, the wine-making capitol of Ireland, and trusts that Irish wine has a future. Elaine Murphy back at Woolen Mills poured both a red and a white Irish wine. Onward to the Blazing Saddles Wholefood Deli – an easy 10-minute walk – a showcase for fresh, vegetarian foods. It is a tiny spot but crammed with food for destination shoppers and the neighboring workforce alike to eat for lunch or carry home for dinner. Like everything in the store, the creamy yellow dal soup contained no dairy, sugar, additives or preservatives ... just lots of taste. A crowd favorite is Nobo, named for the Irish word for “no cow.” It is an ice cream made from avocados, and so good even traditional ice cream eaters opt for its clean, nuanced flavors. Curiously no olive oil, the linchpin of the popular Mediterranean diet, is used in any of the food. Instead, rapeseed oil is preferred. A recently-introduced crop in County Meath’s Boyne Valley, rapeseed is high in Omega 3, 6 and 9, plus vitamin E and contains half the saturated fat of olive oil. Clearly it was time to stop by the pub, and The Swan suited the need. Serving alcohol since 1691,The Swan was known by the sign of a white swan to indicate to an illiterate clientele they had arrived at the right spot. Sometime in the 19th century The Swan was redone to fit Victorian style sensibilities. It remains one of Dublin’s 11 “Heritage Pubs,” complete with cash drawer, snugs for use by women and priests not wanting to be seen drinking publicly and wall-mounted casks, one each for sherry, brandy, port and whiskey. The seven brass taps are the oldest in Dublin. As we sipped a drop of Powers 12-year-old Special Reserve, publican John Lynch recounted tales still bandied about around the slab of Scottish granite bar top. Stories about the occupation in 1916 by the Rebels, and again in 1921. Stories of the escape of Irish Free Forces through a hole punched into the wall, and rugby championships won by Dublin favorite son Sean Lynch, father of the current owners. Refreshed, we walked on to the aptly-named business called The Good Food Store, a grocer and deli. We were welcomed by hand-warming breakfast sausage rolls. Extremely popular in Ireland as a convenient way to grab a meal on the go, as with most fast food around the world, sausage rolls are often a greasy, bland disappointment; not so at this bustling shop. The pork sausage was rich with the flavors of thyme, marjoram, basil, rosemary and sage. Tucked into a piece of puff pastry, this is a roll that with a cup of tea could kickstart a rainy Dublin morning. The store is the perfect destination for all those culinary purchases to take home. Shelves line the store with Irish wares. Irish-made pasta and red sauce, rapeseed oil from Co. Donegal, cutting boards from Waterford and teas from around the world tempt and seduce. After a quick breeze through Market Arcade down the street we dropped in at Parisian-chic Cocoa Atelier. Deviating from the other stops on


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