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the bottom of Boca Grande Pass was in 2005. “We’ve been diving for more than 20 years and we’ve done some very aggressive dives together,” said Wittman. “The phosphate docks are always fun to dive because there are thousands of fish.” Wittman said the dock ledge is filled with sand and limestone and it turns dark very quickly. “It’s very hard to see more than a few feet away. It’s a very challenging dive and that’s also what’s so intriguing about it. The extreme part of it is kind of the allure to it,” he said. They factor in buoyancy just like any other dive. “We are basically between two and three atmospheres of pressure. The deeper you go the less buoyant you become. For example, at 30 feet, your lungs can only hold half the volume of air you could hold on the surface,” Wittman said. Both men said they were extremely impressed with how clean the Pass was the last time they dove it a few years ago. “It was very surprising that for such a deep Pass, there was very little trash,” he said. Wittman is the owner of “Stillwater Charters,” a statewide fishing guide service based in Fort Myers for the past 19 years. He said he fishes in Boca about six days a week during tarpon season. The chart shows the latitude & longitude geographical coordinates for local reefs. except for the Novak and Stump Pass have sunken barges on them. “We try to diversify the materials on the reefs. The Palm Island Ferry Reef has had two barges added it to it over the past ten years,” DeBruler said. Lee County Communications Director Betsy Clayton said Lee County has two artificial reefs inside Charlotte Harbor (Danger Reef and Cape Haze) and at least five in the Boca Grande area: Mary’s, Charlotte, Boxcar, Power Pole and Helen’s. Capt. Chris Wittman, founder of Captains for Clean Water, and his first mate, Chris Zolman have made several dive trips to reefs and to the bottom of the Pass, taking a GoPro camera with them to record the footage. Best friends since childhood, the outdoorsmen said they were both naturally curious to see what’s going on beneath the surface. They’ve been certified divers and spear fishermen together for decades, and that’s how they grew interested in diving in local passes ands reefs. The first time they explored G M


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