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“Kody is more of a vegetarian and scavenger,” Lynn explained. “If a bunny runs into him and touches him on the nose, he’ll probably eat it, but he won’t chase it down the road. Every day he eats three pounds of peanuts, two pounds of carrots, a half dozen eggs, a half dozen pieces of fruit, donuts, lettuce (romaine 48GASPARILLA ISLAND •January/February • 2017 only), cooked meat and raw meat. Their diet is our diet, that’s why they’re dumpster divers.” The conversation brought up an interesting question. Who feeds the animals, and how much does it cost? “My husband and I are the main caregivers,” Lynn said. “We have 14 volunteers throughout the week, but I am the primary feeder. I spend three hours in the evening feeding everyone, and at least 1 ½ hours in the morning. That doesn’t count cleaning and giving medicines. So a full five hours every day is dedicated just to feeding. Every one of these animals have their own diet, too. Of the four tigers and five cougars we have, every one has a slightly different diet. One likes liver, one doesn’t. One likes beef, one likes chicken. We I think when you get buy our chicken from a into something like this local store in Arcadia, when you’re a little and we get our beef on older it’s better. You’re the hoof from the content with the stockyard. We butcher it ourselves here.” continual schedule of It costs around $4,000 maintenance and to $5,000 per month to feeding. That’s how your maintain the food needs days … your weeks of all of the animals and all … your months go. of the money comes from private donations. They are a non-profit organization and animals are available for a sponsorship program if you’re interested in helping to defray the costs. “We have a high-maintenance program here,” Lynn said. “We don’t go on vacations – we can’t. If we take a day trip, which we haven’t done for about five or six years, that’s really something.”


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