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boar and raccoons roamed boldly across the isolated property.” The book also explains how the property Journey’s End sits on was in the shape of a “T,” with the bottom of it ending on the beach. When it was suggested to Dr. Ingram that he buy the heavily wooded beachfront property to the north and south of his land to “square it off,” he refused, saying no one would pay the $15,000 per beachfront lot that Sunset Realty was asking. By 1980, five generations of the Ingram family had lived within the walls of Journey’s End. In 1986, Journey’s End became the only residence in Boca Grande to be nominated and listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Ingram family left the Journey’s End property within the last few years, and it has since been subdivided and sold in pieces. Another story has ended in Boca Grande’s historic saga. Michael Ingram’s brother Leighton (who has since passed away) succinctly summed up the feeling of Journey’s End. “We didn’t own the property,” he said, “it owned us. The challenge in owning a piece of property like this is keeping one foot in the past and the other in the present, and still looking toward the future.” “We have had guests who told us ghost stories about hearing and seeing the headlight of a train that looked like it was going to come through the house,” he said. “Other people have told us of the sensation of being on a train while in the house.” Michael’s sister Ann spoke of the headless ghost as well. “I don’t disbelieve anything,” she said. “We all at some time or another have claimed to see the headless woman. Our first caretaker swore by that ghost.” The plans also spoke of the incredibly sturdy wood used in the home, which had experienced virtually no rot or termite damage at all during its entire existence. In his title examiner’s book, Michael Ingram wrote, “By 1965, Sunset Realty’s inventory of lots acquired from The Boca Grande Land Company was nearly exhausted. Most of the remaining lots were near the ‘outpost to civilization’ on 18th Street. Dr. Jim Ingram has recently purchased the hodgepodge collection of houses and cottages known as Journey’s End. The property is surrounded on three sides by thick palmetto scrub and palm tree woods. Not a soul lived on the three miles of beach to the north, and there were no neighbors closer than three blocks to the south and to the east. At night, abundant wild 65 G M Railroad workers shown here at the Ingram home in 1927. Believe it or not, the railroad actually ran along the beach for a time, on the Journey’s End property.


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