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40 Take a Short Jaunt, Have a Whole Day of Fun! By Marcy Shortuse As the long, hot days melt one into the other, sitting in the air conditioning just to survive seems to be the theme of our lives. Remember, though, in the peak of season when the roads were jam-packed and our favorite places to go were filled to the brim with visitors, how we swore we would take advantage of this time to go wherever we wanted? Well, let’s do it! We’ve listed just a handful of places around the area you may have forgotten about. So get off your duff, pack a cooler with some drinks and sandwiches and let’s hit the road! The Salvadore Dali Museum in St. Petersburg: Everyone knows about Dali’s melting clocks and lobster telephones, but few stop to consider just how ahead of his time he really was. Born in 1904, throughout his lifetime he experimented with several different types of art including cubism, futurism and metaphysical. Much of his work was based on his dreams, so one could only imagine what he normally ate for dinner. Dali was an odd man who made people uncomfortable at times. He was known to show up to his exhibits dressed in dive suits, and had a showmanship about him that was entirely his own. He also believed he was the reincarnation of his dead brother, and once threw a childhood friend over a bridge just to enjoy the feeling. While his friend was moaning in pain under the bridge, Dali sat and ate cherries. The major contribution he made to the art world, as far as the critics are concerned at least, was his “Paranoiac-Critical Method.” He believe that accessing parts of the brain that weren’t explored as often required a particular type of mental exercise, and he used this method to change our world with art. Believe it or not, Dali contributed much of his style to artists such as Raphael, Valazquez and Vermeer. It is true, upon close inspection, that his swans-turned-trees and women about to be eaten by pouncing The Dali Museum tigers due hold a very classic composition. 1 Dali Blvd. One of his most famous phrases was one he wholeheartedly St. Petersburg, Fl. 33701 believed in: “Intelligence without ambition is a bird without wings.” (727) 823-3767 The museum is a must-see for anyone who is a lover of art, or architecture for that matter as the building the museum is house in is a true work of art. Some of the subject matter of Dali’s paintings may be a bit questionable for immature viewers, but for children who have been previously exposed to art history the journey should be acceptable. The gardens on the grounds of the museum are also a sight to behold, including a labyrinth hedge structure, so make sure you leave some extra time to explore that as well. Flash photography is not permitted inside the museum, but private photographs without flash may be taken. You are not allowed to bring in large bags or backpacks, luggage, umbrellas, skateboards or large child back carriers. You can take in sketch pads if they are small (9” X 12” or smaller). Sketching in special exhibitions is by permission only. Food is available at a small cafe on the first floor of the museum where primarily Spanish fare is served. No outside food or drink is allowed. Daily hours are 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Museum and Garden Store open 30 minutes longer after closing) Tickets for adults are $24 Seniors 65+ $22 Military, law enforcement, firefighter and educator admission is $22 Students 13 to 17, $17 Children 6 to 12, $10 Children 5 and younger, no charge Go to thedali.org for information on special pricing events and special exhibits


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