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In addition to posting YouTube videos, Postmodern Jukebox releases audio compilations that often wind up on Billboard's Jazz Albums chart. Before Bradlee’s gimmick became a sensation, he used it to land gigs as a jazz pianist in New York, where jazz pianists were hardly in short supply. “I did it to get work, originally,” Bradlee recalls. “I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be great if I created a show based on taking all these current songs, and re-imagining them? What if all these artists were alive back in the ’40s or ’50s and wrote those songs then? How would they sound?’” In 2009, Bradlee took a keyboard to his basement and mounted “a cheap little camera” in front of it. He then played a medley encompassing dozens of ’80s pop songs done ragtime style. He posted it on YouTube and waited to see what would happen. As is sometimes the case on YouTube, the video found an audience and its popularity exploded. “All of a sudden, I had views in the tens of thousands,” Bradlee recalls. “I ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ friends starting to join me.” Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox, which he formed in 2013, is as hard to categorize as it is easy to love. They might perform a doo-wop version of Pitbull and Kesha’s “Timber,” a ’40s swing version of Gwen Stefani’s “Hollaback Girl,” or a ragtime version of Justin Bieber’s “Love Yourself.” 58 artsLife | FALL 2016 Miley Cyrus got the doo-wop treatment when Postmodern Jukebox covered her hit “We Can’t Stop” the day following that infamous televised twerk on the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards. “We Can’t Stop” became the group’s most popular video up to that time. “The kind of music we do, and the way we do it, is why you see younger fans and older ���������� ������ �������� ���������������� ���������� ������������������ �������� ���������� took Postmodern Jukebox on tour in 2014. The group is a revolving collective of 30 to 40 musicians, about a dozen of whom perform together at any given show. Most are known by name primarily among hardcore Postmodern Jukebox fans — but all are highly regarded professionals who share Bradlee’s quirky aesthetic. “What we do is as close to a musical time machine as you’re going to get,” Bradlee adds. “It’s kind of like going to a party with Frank Sinatra in the ’40s. Sometimes we see people in the audience dressing up vintage style, whatever that means to them.” The musicians bring an effortlessly cool hipster vibe to their performances, in both attitude and attire. Stage clothes can generally be described as sleek and sassy “paint-thetown” ensembles that any self-respecting Rat Packer would be proud to own. Although Postmodern Jukebox is a visual GUIDED BY FAITH. EDUCATED FOR LIFE. Serving Transitional Kindergarten – 8th Grade ������������������������������thechristschool.org Located in the Heart of Downtown Orlando


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