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Highly credentialed professionals teach the Jazz Music Intensive Workshop (top), while Rock Band (above) emphasizes both individual musicianship and how to play collaboratively. Shown is student Benjamin Rappaport, who's all about that bass. FALL 2016 | artsLife 23 As the school grows and its initial students return for more training, it’s offering more advanced classes. There’s now Advanced Musical Theater Performance, for example, which focuses not just on stage techniques but also on the business acumen required for a musical theater career. And there’s a broader array of classes in the Yamaha Music Education System, which takes a holistic approach to musical training that combines basic keyboard skills, rhythm and notation, music appreciation — and lots of fun. Brazil says the arts center has seen growing enthusiasm for classes that help students become a “triple threat” in musical theater through dance, voice and acting. Those who train in these related disciplines gain new perspectives from a variety of teachers and the dynamics of different groups, Brazil notes. Another popular course is Rock Band, ������������ �������� ���������� ���������������� ���������� ���������� �������� ������ ������ the schedule again. How do you teach a style of music that's usually learned on the ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������- standing parents? The emphasis is on collaboration, Brazil ������������ ������������������ ���������� ������ �������������������� ������ ������ ����- strument, and they improve their own skills as they learn to work together. “You have to make room in your playing for someone else to be heard,” she adds. Brazil expects 22 instructors this fall, all of them selected for teaching ability in addition to artistic accomplishment. “Just because you’re a good performer doesn’t mean you’re a good teacher,” she says. By all accounts, Nathan May is both, and ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� goal of providing a place where students can “explore, create, experiment, persevere and take risks without fear of failing.” May says he subscribes to “a philosophy of string playing that teaches ergonomic ways to use our body weight and gravity to access the most out of our playing.” He's noticed that some of today’s young overachievers are too tense to do their best ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ is often to simply help them relax before working on technique and musicality. “At the end of the day, we want students to be lovers of music,” he says. “It’s not something scary; it’s not all about competition.” ��


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