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�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� businesswoman and the granddaughter of Charles Hosmer Morse. The McKeans cultivated peacocks on the grounds and surrounding the estate, ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� mother. Much of the surrounding property has been developed, although 48 acres have been retained under the auspices of the Genius Preserve. then grow and sell new trees, for which the Hakes family would receive a $2 per tree royalty for three years. The savvy Gillett also applied for and received a patent for the fruit, which he proposed naming the Hakes orange. Louis and Ethel demurred, and Temple suggested that it be called “the Winter Park Hybrid.” Ultimately, The Florida Grower magazine recommended that it be named for Temple, who first recognized its potential. As the Temple orange became popular nationwide, the tree from which it sprang became something of a tourist attraction, prompting the Hakeses to erect a wire fence around it. But who came up with the idea of crossing an orange and a tangerine? Surely the Winter Park tree, from which millions of others have descended, couldn’t have been the first and only one like it. Tangors, a comparable hybrid, were being grown in the West Indies at the time, and some historians believe that a Florida fruit buyer sent a tangor seedling from Jamaica to Oviedo friends in 1896. About 1900, Allan Mosely, a caretaker in Winter Park, may have obtained budwood from one of those friends, grower J.H. King. Mosely, then, may have grafted the budwood onto a tree in the grove owned by John Wyeth, who would later sell the property to Hakes. None of this is possible to document with certainty. But at the time the Temple orange was patented, Dr. David Fairchild, head of the Bureau of Plant Introductions in Washington, D.C., had other ideas: “This tree is undoubtedly an accidental hybrid,” he declared. (Accidental or not, the so-called “parent tree” can still be seen on Temple Drive, although it no longer bears fruit.) In 1920, Winter Park’s population topped 1,000 for the first time — it would top 4,000 just five years later — and city officials adopted the slogan “City of Homes” as its municipal motto. But the big news two years later was about a hotel, when Ohioans Joseph 54 LIVING IN WINTER PARK and Anna Kronenberger completed the 80-room Alabama Hotel on the south side of Lake Maitland. The Alabama changed hands several times, and was finally closed in 1979. But in its heyday, it hosted such literary luminaries as authors Margaret Mitchell and Thornton Wilder and conductor Leopold Stokowski. (Today, the impressive old building is a luxury condominium complex.) Mediterranean Revival-style Winter Park High School, “the most complete and architecturally perfect school buildings to be found anywhere in the state,” according to an article in Winter Park Post, was built in 1923 on Huntington Avenue. The school remained in that location until 1969, when the present campus, on Summerfield Road, was completed. The original campus remains in use as the Winter Park High School Ninth Grade Center. Also in 1923, Austrian-born hotelier Max Kramer opened the 50-room Hamilton Hotel on Park Avenue South. The building, with balconies overlooking Park Avenue and Central Park, replaced a circa-1880s frame office built by the Winter Park Company. (Today, it’s the Park Plaza Hotel, a boutique property that charms visitors with its elegant, wood-paneled lobby and posh, antique-furnished rooms.) Rollins began getting national attention during the 24-year presidency of Hamilton Holt, which began in 1925. Holt’s innovative teaching method, dubbed the Conference Plan, discouraged the rigid classroom lecture format and encouraged student-teacher interaction. Holt, a Brooklyn native who published a liberal magazine called The Independent in New York from 1897 to 1921, made many changes during his long tenure, and forever altered the look of the New England-flavored campus by adding 23 buildings in the now-familiar Spanish Mediterranean architectural style. In 1926, Holt and Grover, his professor of books, created the Animated Magazine, a live program in a magazine format that brought speakers on a variety of topics to the college every February. Such diverse figures as actress


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